PTSD, Growth & Recovery: Bouncing Forward by Michaela Haas

Trauma and its sequelae are likely the greatest challenge we face as individuals who have experienced them and as healthcare professionals who try to help. For decades and generations, post-traumatic experiences have been misunderstood, mislabeled, and misrepresented. It wasn’t that long ago when I found myself in a shouting match with a military medical healthcare individual who kept screaming at me, “There is no SUCH thing as PTSD!” It wasn’t that long ago when I listened to some of my education program cohort telling me my reactions to what I felt was professorial bullying were probably “cultural” and “well, you know, not Canadian-like.”

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Michael Stone workshop in Ottawa December 7-8, 2015

We are pleased to announce a collaborative venture with Leading Edge Seminars to present this workshop with Michael Stone. Note that you will receive a discount by indicating you are responding via the OMC links.

Michael Stone is a psychotherapist and renowned lecturer on the integration of mindfulness and mental health. His previous presentation in Ottawa on mindfulness and clinical interventions was an in-depth teaching that was experiential and informative for healthcare clinicians. Continue reading

2015 M4 Teacher Training Graduates

We are proud to celebrate our 10th anniversary of Teacher Training and welcome our 2015 cohort of mindfulness teachers who completed the M4 training requirements in the first full 3-day training retreat. Congratulations to all and we look forward to an on-going sharing in your insights and great work! Many thanks as well to our coach teachers, Brittany Glynn, Lakshmi Sundaram, Sheila Robertson, and Jessie Bossé.

 

2015 TTR Group

I am not this body: Mindfulness for Pain Management

maple shadowPain is unavoidable. We inhabit a system that is engineered to become wonky, cranky, and otherwise uncooperative over time. We know this conceptually but not when and how it matters. Why me? What now? tend to be our responses when the body fails us – as it inevitably does. In case you think this is only a problem for aging folk or those afflicted with strange hard-to-diagnose illnesses, it’s not. Athletes injure themselves. Random acts happen to young and old alike that leave them having to reshape not only their bodies but their mental attitudes towards their entire life.

Joy is unavoidable too. We have a resilient system that is subtly wired to sense into experiences that nourish and sustain us. We don’t know this in the definition of sensing joy; we hope and believe it will be true some day – if we’re really good, work hard, and check off all the boxes that we think entitle us to joy. And it’s not just aging folk who do that. In fact, the older you get the more you begin to see that it’s not the boxes you’ve checked off that brought you joy in any lasting way. Continue reading

Craig Mackie RSW joins OMC

Craig We are pleased to welcome Craig Mackie RSW to the Ottawa Mindfulness Clinic. Craig has a BA in developmental psychology, MA in philosophy and a Masters of Social Work. He has worked in therapeutic recreation, mental health, and social services for over 10 years. He is a certified Transformative Mindfulness practitioner, 16 Guidelines international facilitator trainer, and has taken multiple trainings in clinical and mindfulness modalities. Currently he teaches in the Applied Mindfulness Meditation program at the University of Toronto and is the Director of Essential Change.

At the clinic, Craig will be offering mindfulness programs for youth and adults.

Program and contact information on the adult and youth programs can be downloaded here:

Youth – Transformative Mindfulness.

Adults- Transformative Mindfulness.

 

Self-Compassion Practices for Emotional Distress: It’s not just about being kind

leavesSelf-Compassion practices and programs are gaining momentum in psychological treatments and look like they might well become the next wave of transforming our painful feelings. Mindful Self-Compassion (1), developed by Drs. Christopher Germer and Kristen Neff, is an approach that can be both an adjunct to conventional therapies as well as a stand-alone treatment model. The interesting and very useful aspects of this approach are its applicability to our multilayered experiences of suffering. First, let’s look at what they define as Self-Compassion.

Neff (2) describes it as a three-fold system that are antidotes to the experiences that cause us suffering. (A sidebar note: Suffering is typically described as Pain multiplied by our Resistance to the reality of that pain (3)). Here’s a table that summarizes Neff’s definition of self-compassion. Continue reading

The Refugees of Mindfulness: Rethinking Psychology’s Experiment with Meditation

A well-thought through article on informed consent and the impact of mindfulness meditation in clinical settings.

Aloha Dharma

“Jill” is 32 and works as a lawyer in the southwest. She wrote to me explaining that during her meditation she sometimes feels a panic attack coming on and has disturbing mental images. She cannot control it and does not know what she is doing wrong. When we talk for the first time I ask her when it began. “It started a few months after my therapist taught me mindfulness…”

file000351809409Third wave Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the marriage of modern psychology and ancient buddhist meditation. It has grown rapidly in the past decade, and many psychologists and meditation teachers are enthusiastic about the development, seeing it as a blend of the very best of eastern wisdom with western psychological science. Third wave CBT goes under a variety of names such as Mindfulness-Based CBT (MBCBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). There are…

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