Mindfulness, Ethics and End-of-Life Care: The impact of Canada’s Supreme Court decision

Today, February 6, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada allowed the appeal against the "blanket prohibition on assisted suicide." An earlier appeal by Sue Rodriguez (Rodriguez v. British Columbia) in 1993 to have the Criminal Code ruling against assisted suicide declared unconstitutional was denied. The upholding of the current appeal (Carter v. Canada) is destined to be [...]

We are 10 Years Old!

Ten years ago, we (Frank Musten & Lynette Monteiro) were inspired by the development of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (see Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression: A new approach to preventing relapse by Zindel Segal, J. Mark Williams & John Teasdale; Guilford Press) and, after a brief correspondence with Dr. Segal, launched the Ottawa Mindfulness Clinic. It [...]

An Ethical Path to Compassionate Community: The fire in the heart of mindfulness

(This is a transcript of talk given at the inaugural meeting of Mindfulness Ottawa, Ottawa ON 2012 November 21.  The preliminary section on "laying down the path by walking" has been excluded.) Let me share here what we have distilled out of 10 years of our path - what Zen teacher Suzuki Roshi calls “one [...]

Fostering the Mind of Poverty

Is it unethical to bring awareness to certain life circumstances? by Lynette Monteiro & Frank Musten The Ottawa Mindfulness Clinic Teacher Training Retreat brings out the best in our participants and this session was no different.  One of the questions that arose from our examination of the impact of the various exercises we invite a [...]

A Rationale for an Ethics-Based Mindfulness Program

This is a slide from Dr. Richard Davidson's keynote speech at the 10th Annual Scientific Conference of The Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society, March 31, 2012.  The text in the second bullet reads: Basic research on "naturally occurring" virtuous qualities; Toward a scientific foundation for secular ethics. The third bullet reads: [...]

The critical role of ethics as process in an MB program – a gentle critique of Grabovac, Lau and Willet’s article

A recent article, Mechanisms of Mindfulness: a Buddhist Psychological Model by Grabovac, Lau and Willett in Mindfulness attempted to re-insert Buddhist Psychology into the foundations of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. Grabovac and her colleagues did a good job of putting the Three Dharma Seals (impermanence, suffering and nonself) into the service of explaining the mechanisms involved in mindfulness-based interventions. [...]